Reviews

The Imperial Controversy: Stop the War Coalition website

Andrew Murray's book counters the view of some leading historians, such as Niall Fergusson, who in recent years have attempted to revise the history of imperialism to put it in a positive light.

Andrew Murray argues that -- instead of accepting the view that the "liberal interventionism" of politicians like Tony Blair represents a progressive development -- we need to examine the reality of the British Empire, "the better to develop an understanding as to why the last thing the great majority of the world wants to see is a repetition, however dressed up."

Read more: The Imperial Controversy: Stop the War Coalition website

The Imperial Controversy: Morning Star 12th February 2010

by John Millington

The Stop the War coalition successfully mobilised millions to oppose the Iraq war and there's no-one better better placed than its chairman Andrew Murray to assess the imperial history leading up to the conflict and blow the pro-war arguments of the "left" unceremoniously out of the water.

Murray's book is a concise, hard-hitting account of the arguments surrounding the build-up to war and the resulting occupation of Iraq.

Read more: The Imperial Controversy: Morning Star 12th February 2010

The Imperial Controversy: Challenge magazine February/March 2010

The following review appeared in the February/March 2010 issue of Challenge magazine by Sylvia Jones.

The Imperial Controversy: Challenging the Empire Apologists is one of three books released by Manifesto Press at this year's Communist University of Britain.  The others are a survey of the Cuban education system by Theodore MacDonald and a history of the 1911 Railway Strike by Robert Griffiths.  Andrew Murray's book completes this initial offering with an outright attack on the pro-war “Left” - today's liberal imperialists.

The book is comprised of five chapters, each of which stands as a separate essay on a distinct topic but which are linked together by the underlying themes of the book and by the order in which they have been placed, each providing the groundwork or rationale for the next.

Read more: The Imperial Controversy: Challenge magazine February/March 2010

The Education Revolution: billgreenshields.org.uk

Review of Theodore Macdonald's book by former NUT president Bill Greenshields.

How is it that a small developing nation, subject to political hostility and economic embargo for 50 years, can have eradicated illiteracy within a two year period, gone on to meet and surpass the UN's Global Development Goals before they were even formulated, and to have built a free, comprehensive and lifelong education system with better outcomes than that of the USA?

Read more: The Education Revolution: billgreenshields.org.uk