Reviews

The Imperial Controversy: Communist Review Summer 2010

by Carol Turner

AS ITS TITLE SUGGESTS, Andrew Murray’s book addresses the attempts of western intellectuals to provide a justificatory gloss for US and British military aggression in Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere.  It is neither an account of contemporary wars nor an exposition of the anti-war movement, in which the author has played a leading role, but a political and historical polemic directed at those who defend George Bush’s war on terror from the safety of their libraries and offices.

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Education Revolution: Tribune Magazine 28 May-3 June

by Enrico Tortolano

The Cuban revolution has been an inspiration for contemporary Latin American social and political movements sweeping across that region, yet remarkably little attention has been given to its successful social policy developments. Tales of the armed struggle in transformation of government are abundant, and Cuba is frequently discussed in terms of the armed struggle in Latin America and Africa, the foco theory of guerilla warfare and Che Guevara's idea of the New Man, but specific strands of social development are a hidden history in need of exploration.

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The Imperial Controversy: Tribune Magazine 21-27 May 2010

by Nathaniel Mehr

A terrible complacency has for some time been seeping into centre-left discourse on the question of empire; in this short book Andrew Murray, best known for his work as chair of Stop the War, looks critically at how a humanitarian reading of imperialisms, past and present, is becoming obscured by the dogmatic rantings of pro-imperialist celebrity journalists such as Christopher Hichens.

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Killing No Murder: RMT News March 2010

Killing No Murder; South Wales and the Great Railway Strike is Robert Griffith’s extended English language version of his Welsh language book Streic! Streic! Streic! on the class politics of the 1911 rail strike and its significance today.

The book, published in conjunction with RMT, begins with an introduction to the political life of south Wales, within the British context, and through an analysis of Parliamentary politics, the role of religion and the early trade union movement.

 

Read more: Killing No Murder: RMT News March 2010